Valentina Mazzoli, M.Sc.

Valentina Mazzoli graduated 2017, December 6th.
Since early 2018, Valentina works as a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, on the development of novel musculoskeletal MRI techniques.

To Thesis: Functional MRI of the Lower Extremities


Valentina Mazzoli, M.Sc. | Ph.D. student for the ERC project BioMechTools. Orthopaedic Research Laboratory Nijmegen, radboudumc, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre Valentina.MazzoliAapje…..
T: +31 (0) 24 36 13366 (secretary)
About Me
Research Impression
Publications

About Me

I completed my B.Sc. studies in Physics at the Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna (Italy) in 2010. In 2011 I moved to the Netherlands for a master in Applied Physics at the TU/e Eindhoven University of Technology. For my master thesis project I joined the Biomedical NMR group, in the department of Biomedical Engineering at TU/e. My project focused on cardiac muscle fibers evaluation using Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).

As of November 2013 I am a Ph.D. student in the project BioMechTools: Biomechanical Diagnostic, Pre-Planning and Outcome Tools to improve Musculoskeletal Surgery, funded by an ERC Advanced Grant awarded to Prof. Dr. Ir. Nico Verdonschot. My task is to develop and validate MRI methods which can provide more insight into the complex dynamic of the different structures of the knee during motion tasks and loading. This research is done in collaboration with the Biomedical NMR group of Eindhoven University of Technology and the Department of Radiology of the AMC in Amsterdam. My workplace is both based in TU/e (v.mazzoli@tue.nl) and AMC (v.mazzoli@amc.uva.nl).

My Supervisors
Radboudumc
TU/e
TU/e
AMC
Nico Verdonschot,Prof. Dr. Ir.
Klaas Nicolay, Prof. Dr.
Gustav Strijkers, Dr. Ir.
Aart Nederveen, Dr. Ir.
Orthopaedic Research Lab
BioMedical NMR group
BioMedical NMR group
Novel MRI techniques

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Research Impression

Conventional static MRI is able to provide a vast amount of information regarding the anatomy and pathology of the musculoskeletal system. However orthopaedic patients may benefit from more advanced imaging techniques that enable the acquisition of functional information. In vivo measurements of joint loading and motion are then necessary to the understanding of joint mechanics and the effective diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal pathology. Furthermore early tissue damages could be better elucidated in dynamic conditions than in a static situation.

The goal of my research is to develop MRI based tools to visualize and evaluate the conditions of the structures of the knee, including soft tissue, under dynamic loading. We also aim to exploit dynamic MRI for evaluation of early changes in mechanical properties of tissues due to pathological conditions. These data will provide highly detailed information to be used for creating patient-specific biomechanical models. With these models we aim to develop superior diagnostic and evaluation tools to quantify the degenerative status of orthopaedic patients.
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Publications

Publications

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